Users online: 55  Small font sizeDefault font sizeIncrease font size Print this article Email this article
Search Again
 Back
 Table of Contents
 
 Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles
 Citation Manager
 Article Access Statistics
 Reader Comments
 Email Alert
 Add to My List
 * Requires registration (Free)
 

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed6730    
    Printed80    
    Emailed4    
    PDF Downloaded441    
    Comments [Add]    
    Cited by others 1    

Recommend this journal

 
ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2012  |  Volume : 3  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 17

Diagnostic and surgical challenges in resection of cerebellar angle tumors and acoustic neuromas


Department of Neurological Surgery, Goodman Campbell Brain and Spine, Indiana University, Indianapolis, Indiana, USA

Correspondence Address:
Aaron A Cohen-Gadol
Department of Neurological Surgery, Goodman Campbell Brain and Spine, Indiana University, Indianapolis, Indiana,
USA
Login to access the Email id

© 2012 Patel et al; This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.


DOI: 10.4103/2152-7806.92931

PMID: 22439108

Get Permissions

Background: Cerebellopontine angle (CPA) lesions can mimic more common tumors through nonspecific symptoms and radiologic findings. Methods: To increase the preoperative diagnostic accuracy for CPA pathologies, the authors review the full spectrum of reported CPA lesions. Results: A wide spectrum of lesions mimics vestibular schwannoma (VS) in the space of the CPA. Conclusion: The presence of any suspicious clinical and radiographic finding uncharacteristic of VS makes it necessary to maintain a broad differential diagnosis list. Differentiation of CPA lesions, although challenging, may be best achieved by incorporating the clinical history, physical exam findings, audiometry results, and multi-modality imaging studies to construct a comprehensive preoperative knowledge of the lesion. This knowledge will allow improved operative execution and outcomes.



[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*

        

Print this article         Email this article